This is an encouraging development, but beware of sidelining the Oromo parties as usual. They are nowhere to be found.

This is an encouraging development, but beware of sidelining the Oromo parties as usual. They are nowhere to be found.

 “The conflict in Tigray presents a dire humanitarian situation and a direct threat to Ethiopia’s historic transition to democracy. This bipartisan resolution encourages the Ethiopian federal government, under the leadership of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, and the Tigray People’s Liberation Front to engage in dialogue that will address grievances and pursue a peaceful and sustainable end to the conflict. A stable and democratic Ethiopia is critical to the security of the broader region, and the United States will continue to be supportive of good-faith efforts to further democratic progress.”
—- Senator James Risch
SR News Update
 
Report reaching us from the Tigray region indicates that fighting is still ongoing on multiple fronts, with thousands of people killed including senior officials from both sides.
According to our sources, fighting has been intense in the western and central parts of the Tigray region and in particular in and around Shire town. Reportedly, heavy fighting was also reported in Hidmo, Yechilay, Samara, and Zufan districts that are bordering the Amhara region on Sunday night.
Meanwhile, Colonel Shambel Beyene of the Ethiopian defense force was killed in Tagaze, according to our sources. An unconfirmed report indicates that Gabre Sadik, TPLF military wing spokesman has been also killed.
 
According to key sources close to the EDF, General Abebaw Tadese of EDF is also reported to have died. Abebaw Tadese was the head of operations and has been leading the fighting to remove the TPLF administration. He reportedly died of his injuries a week ago.
The government on Saturday allowed the first convoy of humanitarian aid — seven white trucks from the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the Ethiopian Red Cross that arrived in the regional capital Mekelle.
 
“Doctors and nurses have been … weeks without new supplies, running water, and electricity,” said Patrick Youssef, the ICRC’s regional director for Africa. “This medical shipment will inject new stocks, help patients,” and reduce those impossible life-or-death triage decisions.”
The government says Tigray is returning to normal, but the specter of a Nov. 9 massacre that saw hundreds killed in the border town of Mai-Kadra hangs over those who fled, and rumors of ongoing slaughter keep them from returning.
SR News